Broad beans and peas

If you live in a frost area, make a note of when you sow peas, sweet peas or broad beans and when they start to flower. The foliage of these legumes is frost hardy, but the flowers are not. Yet, they do not crop well when temperatures are too warm. Peas can take from 7 to 10 weeks to produce flowers, and broad beans can take from 7 to 13 weeks to produce flowers, depending on local temperatures. Sowing too early or too late for local conditions can result in a disappointing crop. As a general rule where frosts occur, do not sow seed until 10 weeks before the usual last frosts in your area. If you have unusually late frosts, you can protect your plants with a temporary plastic canopy, if a frost is predicted.
It is too late to grow broad beans as a crop in warmer areas, but they can be sown in all areas as a green manure crop where you intend to sow tomatoes next spring. Broad beans inhibit the growth of fusarium wilt – a fungal soil disease that can affect a wide range of plants, including tomatoes. If grown as a green manure, the plants are slashed when knee high. Broad bean seed sold for green manures may be called fava, or faba, bean.
Peas, broad beans (and sweet peas) like a humus-rich soil with a pH of around 6.5. They will need an application of complete organic fertiliser (see post on Fixing nitrogen). Legumes also need the presence of molybdenum and cobalt in soil for good growth, and an application of seaweed extract tea to the bed before sowing, will ensure these trace elements are available.
Try to avoid periods of heavy rain when sowing legumes because they can rot before germinating in cold conditions. Having said that, we had a 98% germination rate for our peas that endured a week of heavy rain after sowing in a raised bed. The seed had been saved from last year’s crop and had not been treated with anything. I am at a loss to understand why major seed manufacturers feel the need to coat their legume seeds with toxic fungicides.

2 thoughts on “Broad beans and peas

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