Winter spinach

spinach One of my favourite vegetables is winter spinach, also known as English spinach. Spinach is rich in vitamins A, C, and E, folic acid, magnesium, iron, fibre, and contains some vitamin B6. It has a more delicate flavour than silver beet and, unlike silver beet, it can be frozen for use during warmer months. Winter spinach loves cold weather and a well-fertilised soil containing plenty of compost. It has a short growing period at our place because warm weather can extend into late autumn, winters are fairly short and mild, and temperatures rise quickly in spring, causing the plants to run to seed. Sow as soon as weather cools in autumn.
Fortunately, this vegetable grows very quickly, and harvesting can begin 8 weeks after sowing seed. From then on, leaves of all varieties of spinach must be harvested every day or two, or the plants will bolt to seed.

Galilee This year, Green Harvest sent to me seeds of their new open-pollinated variety – ‘Galilee’, and it has performed very well in our conditions. ‘Galilee’ was developed in the Middle East and is more tolerant of warm conditions than other varieties of winter spinach. It has produced a lot more foliage than the other variety we grow (‘Winter Giant’) and its mid green leaves have the same flavour as other spinach varieties. It is a great variety for gardeners who have struggled to grow winter spinach.
To freeze winter spinach: I wash the spinach thoroughly, roughly chop the leaves and stems, then put it in a steamer and blanch it with boiling water, before plunging the steamer into icy water. Then drain, and pack into ice cube trays or zip lock bags for freezing. Spinach in zip lock bags is pressed out to a flat sheet on a baking tray for freezing. This makes it easier to break off sections for adding to recipes.

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