More frogs…

It has been raining for the past ten days and I don’t want to seem ungrateful after so many years of drought but, I am anxious to get out in the garden again and get my hands dirty. At least the frogs are thoroughly enjoying the weather.
I really enjoyed visiting the Frogs Australia Network website, as it contains information about an amazing number of frogs, and you can listen to individual frog calls to aid in identification.

Frog update

Arthur from the Frog and Tadpole Study group (FATS) has informed me that the mottled frogs are “Bleating Tree Frogs”. We have heard these frogs in previous years but had no idea what they looked like. We thought we had lost them when one of our dams dried up during the drought, and our evenings became much quieter, so we are pleased to see that enough survived to restock their species.
Once the majority of the frogs had left the pool, we rounded up the few remaining stragglers and transferred them to our small frog pond. Among the stragglers were this tiny frog, and a similar froglet with a tail. Despite a thorough search of the pool, we were unable to find any more of this variety. I have never seen such a tiny frog before. He is sitting beside a 5¢ piece on the rim of the frog pond.

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Frogs

After many years of drought, we had a lot of rain earlier this year. It was impossible to keep our pool chlorinated, so we waited until the sky cleared before attempting to clean the pool. To our surprise we found the pool contained many hundreds of tadpoles. Frogs are very welcome on our property because they eat insects and spiders. They are also a sign of a healthy environment. Many pesticides and herbicides are toxic to frogs and tadpoles.
The tadpoles were feeding on the algae on the sides of the pool, and looked quite healthy. Apart from providing some shade for them over part of the pool, and providing some ramps for froglets to get out of the pool, we left them to do what tadpoles do best. An old window screen prevents them from being sucked into the filter when we run the pump. I haven’t fed them because I haven’t had any lettuce growing, and I didn’t want to feed them lettuce that could contain systemic pesticides.

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There appears to be three types of tadpoles, one brown, one black, and a very shy type that is a pale, almost translucent, olive. These tadpoles don’t look the same as the small green tree frogs that bred in our small frog pond, as they were quite green by the time their tails had been absorbed (see below).

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The first to become froglets were the brown tadpoles; the other two types still have tails.
These mottled frogs with a dark stripe down each side, aren’t particularly nervous around humans and will allow me to get close enough to photograph them. In sunlight, the tops of their heads look almost like burnished copper, but at other times they look grey-brown. It appears that these froglets belong to the tree frog group because they have no trouble climbing the tiles at the edge of the pool. I spotted one of them hiding in a Birds-nest Fern the other day but most of the frogs are treating our backyard like Club-Med, and spend the day lolling around the pool. I have no idea what kind of frog they are, and would be grateful if someone could enlighten me.

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