Pumpkin update

Now that the pumpkin vine is dying off, we are able to find the entire crop – 27 pumpkins from one vine. Compost and plenty of water are the secrets to healthy pumpkin growth. Despite prolonged periods of rain, the vine has remained healthy without a hint of mildew because full access to nutrients has provided the vine with a healthy immune system. The only down side to this luxurious growth has been that it has provided a multitude of places for our chooks to hide their eggs.

Saving pumpkin seed

If your pumpkin vine has performed well for you this year, it is worth saving seed from one of the best pumpkins as the plants that grow from collected seed will have already adapted to your soil and climate conditions, and pumpkin seed is very easy to save. After harvesting, store the pumpkin for 2 or 3 weeks to make sure the seeds are fully mature. Then cut the pumpkin and scoop out the seeds. Place the seeds in water and rub them to remove the pulp. Viable seeds usually sink to the bottom of the container. Rinse the seeds well, then spread the seeds on a sheet of paper to dry where mice can’t get to them. After two weeks, place seeds in a labelled jar or envelope and store in a cool, dark, dry place.

Harvesting pumpkins

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It’s about time to harvest pumpkins again. Our pumpkin vine this year was a volunteer that sprang up in the chook run from the remnants of an old compost heap. It didn’t get any TLC because we half expected the chooks to trample it before it became established. However, it defied the odds and performed magnificently – which only goes to show how good compost is for growing vegetables.
I think it was only watered once but it received plenty of rain during its growing period, and the vine has produced at least 14 JAP pumpkins that we have found so far. JAP pumpkin is closely related to butternut pumpkin, gramma and trombone squash (Cucurbita moschata). These are thinner skinned and don’t keep as long as the Queensland Blue types (C. maxima).
Because we couldn’t spare the water last year, we bought all our pumpkins and some of them weren’t the best because of the drought. Consequently, we were curious to see what we could expect from our volunteer plant and picked one of the pumpkins early. (As you can see in the photo below, the stem is still moist.) Pumpkins picked at this stage do not keep well but we are using this pumpkin immediately, so it doesn’t matter. Now that they are nearly ripe, we will put a broken piece of foam box or thick cardboard under each fruit to keep them drier and clear of the ground, so they are less likely to rot. We will be leaving the rest of the crop until the vine dies off, and the stems become brittle, as that is when they develop their full flavour and store well. If you can’t wait that long, at least wait until the tendril closest to each pumpkin browns off.
Don’t worry about frost on your pumpkins, it will only kill the vines, and it is said that frost toughens the skins so that pumpkins keep longer.
P.S. When the vines had died back a bit, we realised that the vine had produced 28 pumpkins. Not bad for a volunteer vine! There were, of course, more than enough to supply family and friends, and we were able to sell the rest through our local organic greengrocer.
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