Crop rotation

Crop rotation is the practice of allowing a minimum of three years between growing a particular family or group of plants in the same patch of soil. This practice is essential to maintaining healthy soil because it prevents the build-up in soil of pathogens that cause soil-borne plant diseases. Plants weakened by diseases also attract pests. Many modern farmers have forgotten the importance of crop rotation. The trend is towards monoculture and these farmers have to rely on stronger and stronger chemicals in an effort to cure plant pest and disease problems.
There are eight main groups of plants that are commonly grown in vegetable gardens. Some groups can be grown together but others, such as legumes and the onion family, don’t make good neighbours.
If you find that pests and disease are repeatedly affecting your vegetables, and crops are disappointing, try the crop rotation below and you will find that your garden rewards your efforts. This rotation has six sections and includes a green manure grain, plus a legume green manure if you don’t want to grow your own peas and beans. The green manures are included because they recycle nutrients, replenish organic matter in topsoil, and help inhibit soil pathogens. In this rotation, legumes precede the tomato family because broad beans inhibit a fungal wilt that affects tomatoes. Organic matter assists in keeping soil healthy because it provides a habitat for beneficial microorganisms that keep disease organisms under control and improve soil structure.
Section 1:
Legumes – peas, beans, broad beans, or a green manure legume.
Section 2:
Solanaceous – Tomato, capsicum, chilli, eggplant, pepino, potato. (Some tomato family diseases can also affect Strawberries.)
Section 3:
Crucifers – broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, Chinese cabbage, cauliflower, horseradish, kale, kohlrabi, mizuna, mustards, radish, rocket, swede, turnip.
Section 4:
Green manure grain – such as barley, cereal rye, corn, millet, oats, sorghum, or wheat – depending on the season. Sweet corn can be grown in Section 4 if you have plenty of compost and don’t need to grow a green manure grain.
Section 5:
Chenopod family – silver beet, beetroot. (Winter spinach can follow a summer crop of beets as long as this group is not grown in the same bed for another 3 years.) Also the Aster group – lettuce, chicory, endive, globe artichoke, Jerusalem artichoke and sunflower.
Section 6:
Umbrelliferous – carrot, celery, coriander, dill, fennel, parsley, parsnip. Also the Allium family – all chives, garlic and onions.

Cucurbits – cucumber, gourd, marrow, pumpkin, rockmelon, squash, watermelon, zucchini. These, except for pumpkin, can be sown with group 5 or group 6, but not both. Pumpkins are best grown on their own because the vines are very vigorous and the roots give off compounds that can deter some other plants. Dill can also be grown with Section 3 to deter cabbage pests. Sweet corn is a good companion for cucumber or beans.

When the legumes are finished, group 2 can be planted in that bed. Group 3 replaces group 2 and so on, with all the groups moving up one bed. If you only have three or four beds, divide some of the beds proportionately, to suit your food preferences. Once your soil is restored to health, you can adjust the rotation to a three or four year one that suits the type of vegetables you prefer to grow, as long as you allow at least three years between the same group.
Crop rotation should also be practiced with flowering annuals and some perennials. Cinerarias and zinnias are related to the lettuce family, petunias are related to the tomato family, and stock and wallflower are crucifers. These plants can succumb to the same diseases that affect the vegetables in that group. Carnations and dianthus can be affected by a wilt disease if they are always planted in the same soil, and carnations, dahlias and irises can also suffer a stem rot disease if crop rotation is not practiced.

5 thoughts on “Crop rotation

  1. Hi, some of my chilli leaves are having yellow blotches and especially along the vein network. Do you have any idea what could be wrong with it? Is it some nutrient deficiency? Thanks!

    Whout seeing them Audrey, I can only guess at a trace element deficiency. Give the plant a thorough watering, then a drink of liquid seaweed extract at weak black tea strength. – Lyn

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