Broad bean harvest

brdbnpod.jpg Broad beans have been very slow to produce pods this year due to an exceptionally cold winter in our area. The adjacent photo was taken on 8th August, and it has been a month before some of the pods were large enough to harvest. When winters are mild, we usually get two harvests of broad beans. When the main crop has finished, we cut the plants back to 30 cm high, and the plants send up shoots from the base, resulting in a smaller secondary crop. However, it looks as though we will have to be satisfied with one crop this year because October can get very hot in our area.

2 thoughts on “Broad bean harvest

  1. According to Seed Savers Jude, broad beans are partly self-pollinated and partly cross pollinated. Our broad beans don’t usually form pods until it is warm enough for bees to get busy in the garden. Before then, unpollinated flowers just fall to the ground and pods do not form. Occasionally, pods will form with one or two seeds missing, but I haven’t come across the problem of completely empty pods before. Are the pods that you found empty full size? I can only guess that either some grub has penetrated the pods and eaten the seeds while they are small,– in which case either your fertilising watering or soil pH needs improving. Or the plants are very deficient in potassium (but this usually also causes a problem known as chocolate spot in broad beans. Organic potassium can be supplied with a couple of doses of seaweed extract tea. Or, the very windy conditions have resulted in all the flowers being self-pollinated and nature has put a stop to seed forming from a weak gene pool. I hope you can identify the cause Jude, so that you don’t have this problem in future.

  2. Can you please tell me why broad beans have no beans in the pod? i have grown them for the first time in a no dig garden in Melbourne. They have been exposed to quite a lot of wind this spring could this be the reason?

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