Organophosphates and ADHD

Earlier this week, ‘Today’ program on Channel 9 aired a segment about new research showing a link between organophosphate pesticides and ADHD. The research involved 1,139 children between 8 and 15 years and found high levels of organophosphate metabolites in urine of children with ADHD. This link is not surprising as organophosphates (and carbamates) are neurotoxins. These pesticides work by affecting the central nervous system, and organophosphates were developed for chemical warfare before being used as pesticides.
Both organophosphate and carbamate pesticides block the action of the enzyme acetyl cholinesterase, which regulates the transmission of nerve messages. Well-established research has shown that chronic exposure to organophosphates induces neurological dysfunction. Children are more susceptible to all toxins, including neurotoxins.
Separate research has linked pesticide exposure with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Included in the suspects is the very popular Derris dust, which has also been found to be a neurotoxin.
‘Today’ presenters advised that all fruits and vegetables should be carefully washed before eating. Good advice to be sure, but advice that misses the point that some organophosphate pesticides commonly used on food plants are systemic. Systemic pesticides enter the sap system in plants, are distributed to all parts of the plant, and can’t be washed from our food. As a lot of our food is now imported from countries with differing standards for pesticide regulation, we have no way of knowing whether or not our food contains systemic organophosphates. AQIS carries out testing on only a tiny percentage of imported foods.
Write to your federal Member of Parliament requesting a ban on the use of systemic organophosphate pesticides in local produce, and improved inspections and standards for imported foods. Remind your Member of the cost to the community in treating the problems caused by these pesticides. Where possible, buy organic produce for your children, and grow as much as you can using organic methods. It will not only be healthier – you will notice it tastes better, too.

3 thoughts on “Organophosphates and ADHD

  1. Would be interested to know more about Derris dust as I thought it was relative safe being derived from plant root extract.
    Chris, I’ve written a post about Derris dust on my blog. Hope it answers some of your questions. – Lyn
    Derris dust

  2. I agree with Shayne. But as the writer said how we will know that which vegetables and fruit has these harmful components. I think we must establish more local farmer’s market in every region and stop importing from those countries that don’t regulate the use of pesticide.

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