Passionfruit – hand pollination

To ensure that your passionfruit vine produces lots of delicious, juicy fruit, you may have to hand-pollinate the flowers. Passionfruit vines rely on bees for pollination because their flowers have a large gap between the 5 oval, pollen-bearing male parts (anthers) and the 3 V shaped, female parts (stigmas). There are generally less bees around recently, and they don’t like to venture out in wet or windy weather.
The oval anthers release their pollen early in the morning, but the best time to pollinate is mid morning when the stigmas at the top of each flower bend downwards and secrete a sticky fluid that helps the pollen to adhere to them. The photo below shows the ideal position of the stigmas for pollination.

Only when the female parts of each flower receive passionfruit pollen can the flower form a fruit.
If there aren’t many bees around your passionfruit vine, or if you have a young vine with few flowers, you can pollinate the flowers by hand. The best way to do it is with a soft watercolour paintbrush, and this short video demonstrates the practice beautifully: Hand-pollination of passionfruit
Another way to hand-pollinate is to remove an anther and brush it onto the stigmas. However, each flower needs at least a hundred ovules to develop into seeds for healthy fruit. Otherwise, the fruit will be hollow, or lightweight and not juicy, so the paintbrush ensures a good dusting of pollen where it is needed. Dust the pollen gently over the underside of all 3 stigmas of a different flower on the vine, then repeat with the next flower.**
Passionfruit take 2 – 3 months to develop and ripen – the very popular ‘Nellie Kelly’ slightly longer. Passionfruit, like good wine and cheese, taste best when they are mature. Fruit should have a deep colour and feel heavy. They are juiciest when they are slightly wrinkled.
** Some hybrids and cultivars need a second variety for good cropping. Check with your nursery before purchasing a vine.

Taking cuttings

Full Moon phase is a good time to take cuttings, and cuttings can be taken from deciduous plants from hardwood stems, while pruning. Always trim to a horizontal cut at the bottom of the stem to be used for cuttings, and make a slanted cut at the top, otherwise it is easy to plant deciduous cuttings upside down. The chosen section should contain 5 or more nodes (joints in the stem) to allow for trimming.
Fill pots with a sandy potting mix, and trim the base of the cuttings (with a horizontal cut) to just below a node. Position the cuttings around the inside edge of each pot spaced far enough apart to allow roots to spread. Try to have two nodes below the level of the potting mix. Water gently to settle the mix around the cuttings. Keep potting mix just damp, and keep cuttings in a warm, well-lit area out of direct sunlight and wind until the cuttings show signs of growth. Carefully move them into separate pots and feed with weak fertiliser tea, until ready for planting out.